Reports


A massive sensitization campaign conducted in the Harare North District to sensitise corporates on the plight of orphans and vulnerable children in the district has seen more than ten corporates pledging their support to that cause. Subsequently, a hundred and eight families of Hatcliffe Extension which comprise of child headed households and children infected and affected by HIV/AIDS are going to benefit from livelihood support and educational assistance from the organization on a monthly basis and per term respectively.
An outreach programme which was conducted in conjunction with the local Child Protection Committee (CPC Hatcliffe) resulted in the identification of OVC to be recruited for life skills training and sexual reproductive health teaching. Great strides have also been made in terms of reducing the exposure of children to infection by discouraging high risk behaviour amongst adolescence in the community.

Vision HIV/AIDS July Report
Vision
A world in which all children including children infected and affected with HIV and AIDS are treated as citizens worthy of dignity and respect with their needs met and rights upheld.
Mission
To uphold the rights of orphans and vulnerable children, giving them emotional, social and practical support meeting their needs and providing encouragement and assistance to those who wish to go to school or engage in various life skills training activities and change their lives working in partnership with relevant stakeholders  and partners who share our vision.
Objectives

  • To provide educational and livelihood support to orphans and vulnerable children.
  • To provide counselling, psychosocial support and awareness programmes to orphans and vulnerable children.
  • To provide life skills and entrepreneurship training to orphans and vulnerable children.

Activities
Livelihood support
The organisation managed to provide food packs and soap to orphans and vulnerable children in five families of Hatcliffe Extension. Willard and Tatenda Viriri are brothers living alone in Hatcliffe extension at stand number 4814. These boys were left vulnerable when their parents succumbed to AIDS; this deprived them of their right to education, decent shelter, food among others.

Tafara Mandimba a widow who resides at stand number 5998 Hatcliffe Extension she is disabled lives with her three children. She lost her husband and a daughter as a result of AIDS.She is struggling to provide for the children and sending them to school.

Sisa Nyamutamba a widow on treatment who resides at stand number 5762 received food packs from Vision HIV/AIDS. She said life is unbearable for her and her two children as they are failing to secure food and other basics. Even though she is getting ARVs they are not being effective because they are not being complemented by a balanced diet. Her desire is to see her children going to school and became professionals. However one thing that keeps haunting her is having her stand repossessed by the government in the event that she fails to build a structure within the stipulated time frame on the lease agreement or when she passes on. “I fear for my children they will become street children if I do not build a house for them before I die”, she said.

Tatenda, Cliffton and Perfect Mbambo are brothers who reside at stand number 5506 Hatcliffe Extension. Their parents passed away and Tatenda their elder brother who is aged 17 said he is finding it difficult to care for the family. “At times we go for days without food, we want to go to school but we cannot afford to pay the school fees and provide for ourselves”, said Tatenda to Vision HIV/AIDS outreach workers as they handed him the food pack.

Eighteen year old Mary Lomwe, who stays with 4 siblings, said she is finding it difficult and unbearable to support her siblings since she does not have a source of income. Both parents succumbed to the HIV/AIDS scourge and left her siblings in her custody. She disclosed that at times she finds herself having to exchange sex for food and other basics. Mary however lamented that continued livelihood support and counselling will help her stop such high risk behaviour.
NB: All names used in this report are pseudo names.

Day and night outreach
Five families in Hatcliffe Extension were outreached during the month. The outreach was done to initiate contact and build repertoire with children infected and affected by HIV and those in child headed families. This activity was also conducted to assess the gravity of their situation and find possible interventions. A total of eight children (4 males and 4 females) were contacted. Five of the eight children (4 females and one male) received one on one counselling marking the beginning of an ongoing counselling programme. 

Impact
Vision HIV/AIDS livelihood support programme ensures that children infected and affected by HIV/AIDS and those in child headed households have the right to survival, care and develop to the fullest. Most children who fall under this category in the community (Hatcliffe Extension) lack basics such as mealie- meal, cooking oil and soap among others. As a result, girls are forced to engage in high risk behaviour which exposes them to HIV whilst boys engage in criminal activities to get some income for their livelihoods.  Follow ups made on the children particularly those who received livelihood support indicated that these children now use their time productively thereby reducing their vulnerability to infection. Experience has shown us that outreach is one of the most important ways of being there for vulnerable children. This serves as an important tool in showing children that someone cares for them hence an impetus for behaviour change.  4 girls who were reported to be engaging in prostitution along the Domboshava highway have since stopped after being taught on the dangers of engaging in such high risk behaviour by Vision HIV/AIDS volunteer outreach workers. The presence of outreach workers in the community during the day and sometimes during the night has had a positive impact on instilling a culture of positive living to children living with the virus and the beginning of a progressive programme promoting behaviour change amongst adolescents.

Observations

  • There is general lack of proper sanitary facilities in Hatcliffe Extension which exposes people, children in particular to infection
  • Most of the children particularly girls in child headed households are prone to sexual abuse during the night due to the kind shelter (shacks) in which they live in
  • Children are living on the properties of their deceased parents hence the lease agreements of most of these properties are now close to their expiration dates
  • There are a few places of social cohesion in the community hence the sprouting of illicit beer outlets which expose children the to the dangers of HIV infection

Challenges

  • Absence of a reliable source of funding has adversely affected our operations
  • Inability to respond urgently in cases that need our urgent attention due to lack of resources particularly an outreach vehicle
  • Failure to meet targets and deadlines due to bureaucracy in some of our partners who provide essential resources and the fact that the organisation is currently understaffed
  • Regular power cuts have adversely affected our work.

Lesson(s) Learnt

  • Vulnerable children have an imaginary stigma which they use to get attention and manipulate childcare workers. 

 

Recommendations

  • Engaging local authorities and policy makers on the issue of lease agreements for children living on properties of deceased parents
  • Distributing blankets, clothing and sanitary ware to beneficiaries who are in urgent need of these products
  • Increasing the number of children on livelihood support including nutritious food stuffs for children living with HIV
  • Building a multi-purpose information resource centre in Hatcliffe extension
  • Continued identification of children in real need of assistance in Hatcliffe Extension

Future Plans (to be done during the month of August)

  • Distribution of livelihood support
  • Distribution of school related assistance ( school fees, uniforms and stationary)
  • Tree planting exercise
  • Participation at the Harare Agricultural Show
  • Day and night outreach
  • Fundraising activities
  • Behaviour change workshops and focus group discussions
  • Psychosocial support and counselling for children living with HIV
  • Continued engagement of local authorities on the building of an Information Resource Centre.

 

August Report
Vision
A world in which all children including children infected and affected with HIV and AIDS are treated as citizens worthy of dignity and respect with their needs met and rights upheld.
Mission
To uphold the rights of orphans and vulnerable children, giving them emotional, social and practical support meeting their needs and providing encouragement and assistance to those who wish to go to school or engage in various life skills training activities and change their lives working in partnership with relevant stakeholders  and partners who share our vision.
Objectives

  • To provide educational and livelihood support to orphans and vulnerable children.
  • To provide counselling, psychosocial support and awareness programmes to orphans and vulnerable children.
  • To provide life skills and entrepreneurship training to orphans and vulnerable children.

Activities
Tree Planting Exercise.
Fifty male children from Hatcliffe Extension participated in a tree planting exercise at the Pomona Stone Quarries premises. The selection criterion, which was used by the local Child Protection Committee, prioritized children who are attending secondary school and those who are heading households. The exercise was conducted so that the children could learn and appreciate the importance of conserving the environment and get some income for their livelihoods. The participants also got some school related assistance from the company as a form of appreciation. Reproductive Health forums and focus group discussions were conducted during tea and lunch breaks with the participants to promote awareness on STIs and HIV/AIDS and get information for effective interventions to their unique situations. Counseling sessions were also conducted with truants and children who were exhibiting attention seeking behaviour. Misconduct and indiscipline resulted in the reduction of the number of participants to thirty.

Livelihood Support
Four families of Hatcliffe Extension which made up a total of eighteen individuals received livelihood support from Vision HIV/AIDS. This was done to supplement the families’ food stocks and provide nutritious food for those who are on treatment.  Most of those who received the support were child headed households and widows and children on treatment (ART).  The families received mealie meal, cooking oil, salt, beans and soap.

Viola Tembo is a widow who stays with her four children (three females and one male) at stand number 5303.  Both Viola and her eldest daughter are on treatment and could not hide their gratitude at receiving food packs. “Thank you so much for the food, it came at the right moment”. She further lamented that she will be cushioned until she gets some income to purchase some more food.                                  

Lisa Mutondo is a widow who stays at number 5350. She is living with her six children (four males and two females). The family survives on Lisa’s small earnings from menial jobs she does in surrounding farms. She sometimes sends her children to beg on the streets in the Harare CBD.  She disclosed that she is not in a position to adequately clothe and feed her children from her income. On receiving the livelihood support she burst into tears and said “I am relieved, I didn’t have anything to cook for the children today, God is surely faithful.” Lisa lamented that she has a problem of accommodation since she and her six children stay in one cramped shack.


Grace Chisora stays at stand number 4751 with her children (two females and one male). Since she is a widow on treatment and is constantly sick she is not in a position to provide for her children. When she is healthy she cannot provide for her children because she has an eyesight problem. She said that she can no longer work for her children hence she depends on handouts from well wishers. Her children are compelled to go on the streets to beg during school holidays and weekends to save the situation.


Tafara Mandimba resides at number 5998 with her mentally challenged son. She was considered again this month because she sometimes feeds destitute children who used to benefit from Christian Care’s soup kitchen programme which was run at her house. She said she was facing challenges in providing for destitute children who haven’t stopped coming to her house for feeding even though the soup kitchen programme stopped a long time ago.


NB: Pseudo names were used in this report
More families are to receive livelihood support as the month of September progresses.
Harare Agricultural Show
Vision HIV/AIDS participated at the 2011 edition of the Harare Agricultural Show which ran from the 19th to the 27th of August under the National AIDS Council (NAC) with support from the Wild Geese Lodge, Home Style Bricks and Pomona Stone Quarries. Distribution of flyers and brochures to concertize policy makers, business people and the general public on the plight of orphans and vulnerable children in slums and marginalized communities were our main activities at the show.
An average of twelve thousand people passed through our stand and the majority of them expressed their desire to support any interventions intended for orphans and vulnerable children. Contacts were established with twelve corporates who either expressed their desire to support the organization or have the potential to do so. The organization also established contacts with various organizations in the HIV/AIDS care and support and also helped in the distribution of their information, education and communication material.
Counseling and Reproductive Health
Six male and four female children were counseled during the month. Most of these children were either exhibiting some attention seeking behavior or approached Vision HIV/AIDS with their problems for counseling. The one on one counseling method was used. All of them were empowered to make informed decisions and deal with their problems after the counseling sessions. Counseling sessions were also conducted with children in child headed households.
Reproductive Health sessions were also held to inform participants on STIs and HIV/AIDS in order to encourage awareness and prevention. Forty male children (mainly adolescents) who participated in the tree planting project participated in the sessions. The discussions were conducted during tea and lunch breaks. Discussions included question and answer sessions to ascertain the extent to which the participants knew about particular topics of discussion. The facilitators added some information where it was necessary.
Outreach
Day outreach in Hatcliffe Extension continued during the month with most of it being conducted in order to ascertain the severity of the situation of orphans and vulnerable children in real need. Follow-ups to assess the impact of Vision HIV/AIDS’s interventions were also done during the outreach. A total of fifty families were visited during the month and their needs were documented. The outreach team also conducted follow up visits for a hundred and eight families who are to receive livelihood support from the organization.

Impact
Since the beginning of our operations in Hatcliffe Extension a number of positive changes have been noted in the community. A good number of children have showed their willingness to participate in our programmes. Livelihood support has brought a lot of relief to families who are receiving the support on a monthly basis. These families can now afford two decent meals a day, something which never happened before the intervention from the organization. Livelihood support given to girls in child headed households has seen a reduction in behaviour that exposes them to infection. Efforts are being made though to ascertain whether this change in behaviour has translated into the reduction in the rates of STI infection and HIV/AIDS awareness amongst children and adolescents in the community. A lasting relationship has been established between the organization and the hundred and eight families have been identified so that they can benefit from the organization’s livelihood support.
Ongoing one on one counseling done with children who were in need of counseling particularly those who participated in the tree planting project and those in child headed households helped them to appreciate the importance of rules and following orders from superiors in society. This was complemented by the fact that spending the day occupied and away from distressing situations in their community offered some respite to the children. More so, most children heading households have began to acknowledge and understand the responsibilities that go with caring for their siblings. Assessments to ascertain the impact of reproductive health forums showed that most of the participants have been empowered with knowledge on STIs and HIV/AIDS and efforts are being made to see to it that this knowledge is translated into behaviour change. All the misconceptions that the participants had were corrected. According to our outreach staff, this has subsequently led to the correction of the same misconceptions and myths amongst their peers who did not attend the sessions. Children have now developed some trust for the organization’s volunteer outreach workers hence they can now open up on matters that are distressing them.

Ongoing Activities

  • Fundraising
  • Engagement of authorities on the building of a resource centre in Hatcliffe Extension
  • Tree planting exercise

NB:  Distribution of school related assistance (stationary, school fees and uniforms) is to be done is September prior to the opening of the new school term.
Observations

  • Most families, particularly child headed households depend entirely on support from the organization
  • Children in difficult circumstances and in need of counselling often exhibit behaviour traits such as violence and truancy
  • Some of the children’s knowledge on reproductive health is based on myths
  • Most women on treatment are not sticking to their time schedules in taking ARVs
  • Adolescents in the community engage in a lot of high risk behaviour and this explains why most girls in the community get married at tender ages

Challenges

  • Inadequate financial resources mainly attributable to lack of funding have adversely affected our interventions
  • Absence of an outreach vehicle has affected our efficiency and effectiveness
  • Inadequate communication facilities  (internet, telephones etc)
  • We have been inconvenienced a lot because the organization doesn’t have an office in the Harare CBD

Recommendations

  • Carrying out more fundraising and resource mobilisation activities
  • Starting activities in other districts of the Harare Metropolitan Province
  •  Making follow-ups on contacts made during the Harare Agricultural Show
  • Conducting Reproductive Health Forums with female children
  • Mobilising resources for the livelihood support of a hundred and eight families in Hatcliffe Extension

Future Plans (activities for the month of September)

  • Distribution of school related assistance (school fees, stationery and uniforms)
  • Distribution of livelihood support
  • Day outreach
  • Conducting a Reproductive Health Forums

 

September Report


Vision
A world in which all children including children infected and affected with HIV and AIDS are treated as citizens worthy of dignity and respect with their needs met and rights upheld.
Mission
To uphold the rights of orphans and vulnerable children, giving them emotional, social and practical support meeting their needs and providing encouragement and assistance to those who wish to go to school or engage in various life skills training activities and change their lives working in partnership with relevant stakeholders  and partners who share our vision.
Objectives

  1. To provide educational and livelihood support to orphans and vulnerable children.
  2. To provide counselling, psychosocial support and awareness programmes to orphans and vulnerable children.
  3. To provide life skills and entrepreneurship training to orphans and vulnerable children.

Activities
Reproductive Health Sessions
Three Reproductive Health Sessions were held during the month at the Pomona Stone Quarries tree planting site.  The first one, held on the 15th mainly focused on teaching ten male participants: i) types of Sexually Transmitted Infections ii) how they are transmitted iii) how they can be treated. The participation of the participants was satisfactory since the facilitators used a question and answer approach to allow free flow of information between the facilitators, Emmanuel Kademaunga and Fredrick Mbiva. The second one was held on the 21st at the same venue with different participants and the same facilitators to increase the knowledge of the ten male participants on HIV/AIDS. Three topics were covered and these were: i) the difference between HIV and AIDS ii) how HIV affects the immune system iii) caring and supporting people living with HIV. The last session which mainly focused on prevention of the spread of STIs and HIV and what it means to live with HIV was conducted on the 23rd. The absence of posters, projectors and other stationery particularly were there was need for illustrations were the major setbacks. Despite these challenges,  question and answer sessions which were conducted at the end of every session indicated that the participants had gained a lot of knowledge on the topics covered.

Day Outreach
A total of four outreach visits were conducted during the month in the Hatcliffe Extension Community. The purpose of the visits were to assess project impact particularly to children infected and affected by HIV/AIDS and those in child headed households in the community. A total of twenty families were visited. Discussions were held with the beneficiaries of livelihood support, educational assistance and counseling programmes. This was a monitoring attribute that focused more on changes brought about by interventions of the organization this far. From the reports by outreach staff, it was deduced that there is a consensus amongst beneficiaries that their food and nutrition security has improved due to the continued livelihood support. It was also noted that there is need to secure more resources for educational assistance (school fees, stationery, and uniforms). Children living with HIV/AIDS (CLHA) also highlighted the need for nutritional guidance, improved access to treatment and timely response to emergency situations by the organization’s staff.

Observations by outreach staff:

  1. Cases of sexual abuse are on the rise in the community especially during the night
  2. There is a significant increase in the number of school dropouts (particularly children living with single mothers)
  3. Most teenagers are unmindful to calls for desisting from high risk behaviour that exposes them to  infection

Tree Planting Project
The tree planting project continued during the month with ten male children watering trees on a weekly rotational basis. This watering phase has continued to prioritize school drop outs and children heading households. Reproductive health sessions were conducted during this exercise (report above). Participants have acknowledged the vital role the income from the project has played in ensuring that they are able to take care for themselves and their siblings. Some of the children disclosed that they can now afford basic food stuffs with remuneration from the project. More so, some have even managed to pay school fees to supplement their ordinary level subjects.
Livelihood support project
Vision HIV/AIDS distributed food packs to 5 families. The total number of children living in these families is 16.Of this number 10 are boys and the remaining 6 are girls.
Blessing Kurauone is a 16 years old boy living at stand number 3681; he is staying with his younger brother Knowledge who is 14 years old. Both of their parents died of AIDS leaving Blessing to take care of his brother.”Our father died in 2008 and our mother died 2 years later (in2010), since they died we have never heard from our relatives, “said Blessing. These two brothers run errands for other people for survival. They showed gratitude for the food pack given to them by the organization.

 

October Report


Vision
A world in which all children including children infected and affected with HIV and AIDS are treated as citizens worthy of dignity and respect with their needs met and rights upheld.
Mission
To uphold the rights of orphans and vulnerable children, giving them emotional, social and practical support meeting their needs and providing encouragement and assistance to those who wish to go to school or engage in various life skills training activities and change their lives working in partnership with relevant stakeholders  and partners who share our vision.
Objectives

  • To provide educational and livelihood support to orphans and vulnerable children.
  • To provide counselling, psychosocial support and awareness programmes to orphans and vulnerable children.
  • To provide life skills and entrepreneurship training to orphans and vulnerable children.

Activities
Fruit Distribution
Vision HIV/AIDS conducted a fruit distribution exercise   to orphans and vulnerable children. About 400 children at Grace Mugabe Primary School benefited in this project. The selection of the school children was done with a little help from the teachers and first priority was given to those who are on treatment but overally all the children benefited. The fruits   that were distributed were: oranges, apples, jam squashes and plums. Also 20 households    with a   total number of 77 children (30 boys and 47 girls) benefited in this exercise. All the selected households have 1 or more children who are on ART. This fruit distribution exercise was done to complement these children’s diets especially those who are receiving treatment since fruits are greatly recommended   by health practitioners for their nutritional content (vitamins).
Stationery distribution
 Stationery (exercise books, ball point pens, pencils, rulers and covers) was distributed to orphans and vulnerable children in Hatcliffe Extension. About 400 primary school children at Grace Mugabe Primary School benefited from this exercise. The majority of the children at this community school are from poor and very vulnerable   households thus they cannot afford to pay school fees and buy stationery. The lack of stationery negatively affects the children’s learning.  The organisation is paying school fees for 43 children (19 boys and 24 girls) at this school; these are mostly in child headed households or are under the custody of their grandparents who can nolonger work. Those under the school fees assistance project are the ones who also got first priority in this exercise.

 

Livelihood Support
Vision HIV/AIDS distributed food packs to 5 households with a total number of 16 children. Of this number 7 are boys   and the other 9 are girls.
Miriam Choto is a 67 year old widow residing at stand number 3709 with her 5 grandchildren, Blessing Netsai, Shorai, Amos, and Melissa. All these children’s parents died of AIDS, leaving them in their grandmother’s care. Gogo Choto as she is affectionately called by her grandchildren is also a widow and is now frequently ill as a result of old age thus she can no longer work hence it becomes a huge task to provide for her grandchildren. All the children had to drop out of school because there is no one to pay their school fees. Vision HIV/AIDS gave this family a food pack. Gogo Choto could not hide her gap-toothed smile.
Netsai Shura is a 16 year old girl living with her chronically ill mother and her two younger sisters (Evelyn and Fungai). Netsai is the family’s breadwinner; she sells vegetables, firewood and also runs errands for other people for their survival. Their parents separated three years ago, so when their mother fell ill Netsai and her sisters had to stop going to school. They were very happy when we visited their home with a food pack for them.
Tendai Naso is 15 years old; she stays with her younger sister and two brothers. Their parents died  in an accident in 2010.Since then Tendai had to take up the role of household head .She said she had to stop school when she was in form 2.Tendai gets the very little income they survive on by selling vegetable and working in surrounding farms. The children were very grateful when we gave them the food pack.
Tererai, Tendai and Anesu Neshamba live with their grandmother Gogo Mpofu, who is 57 years old. Both of their parents died of AIDS, and the youngest Anesu was born HIV positive. Their grandmother cannot afford to buy nutritious food for Anesu as well as medication when he falls ill. She also cannot afford to pay their school fees .Tererai (13 years old), the eldest of the children has to help his grandmother to fend for the family. The children and their grandmother were very thankful when they were given their food pack.”Thank you so much my child, sometimes it gets really hard to get something to eat,” said the Gogo Mpofu.
Maria Sarai is 13 years old, she stays alone at stand number 4876 .She says she has never known her father; she used to stay with her mother before she died. Since her mother died she had to go begging in the streets for money and food. She told the story of how some men would take advantage of her situation and sexually abuse her in return for food. Her neighbours sometimes chip in to help her with food, clothes or blankets when they can. Maria could not hide her joy when we visited her.
NB: All names used are pseudo names

Ongoing Activities

  • Fundraising
  • Development of proposals
  •  

Observations

  • Most families, particularly child headed households depend entirely on support from the organization.
  • The educational assistance project is being useful, school attendance has increased.
  •  

Challenges

  • Inadequate financial resources  have adversely affected our interventions
  • The absence of an outreach vehicle has affected our efficiency and effectiveness

Recommendations

  • Carrying out more fundraising and resource mobilisation activities
  • Conducting Reproductive Health Forums with female children
  •  

Future Plans (Activities of the month of November)

    • Distribution of livelihood support ,
    • Day outreach
    • Fundraising

    November Report


    Vision
    A world in which all children including children infected and affected with HIV and AIDS are treated as citizens worthy of dignity and respect with their needs met and rights upheld.
    Mission
    To uphold the rights of orphans and vulnerable children, giving them emotional, social and practical support meeting their needs and providing encouragement and assistance to those who wish to go to school or engage in various life skills training activities and change their lives working in partnership with relevant stakeholders  and partners who share our vision.
    Objectives

    • To provide educational and livelihood support to orphans and vulnerable children.
    • To provide counselling, psychosocial support and awareness programmes to orphans and vulnerable children.
    • To provide life skills and entrepreneurship training to orphans and vulnerable children.

    Activities
    Potatoes Distribution
    Vision HIV/AIDS   distributed potatoes to orphans and vulnerable children. 35 households    with a   total number of 147 children (64 boys and 83 girls) benefited in this exercise. All the selected households have 1 or more children who are on Anti Retroviral Therapy. Each family got about 10kgs of potatoes. This exercise was done to complement these children’s diets especially those who are receiving treatment as potatoes are some of the foodstuffs that are greatly recommended   by health practitioners for their nutritional content.
    Livelihood Support
    Vision HIV/AIDS distributed food packs to four (4) families in Hatcliffe Extension which made up a total of fourteen individuals received livelihood support from Vision HIV/AIDS. This was done to supplement the families’ food stocks and provide nutritious food for those who are on treatment.  Most of those who received the support were child headed households and children on treatment (ART).  The families received mealie meal, cooking oil, salt, beans and soap.
    Vimbai Sithole is 16 years; she is living with her young brother Tendai (10) and their chronically ill mother. Their father died of AIDS in 2009 .Since then their mother has been sick. Vimbai is the one taking care of the other two. She has to sell vegetables to earn a living. She was really happy when she received the food pack. ”Thank you so much for this food pack , sometimes life gets really tough and we can go for some days without a good meal, during such times I even have to beg for food for our mother since she is ill”, she said.

    Phineas Machona (17 years) lives with his two brothers Marko (15 years) and Misheck (7 years) at stand number 3681.Both of their parents succumbed to the pandemic. First it was their father who passed on in 2007 then followed their mother who died in 2010.Phineas had to drop out of school to look after their mother when she fell sick. He is providing for their upkeep by selling firewood.” I am very grateful for the food, I really didn’t know what to do today because we had nothing to eat”, Phineas said

    Chenai Mushonga (15 years) stays at stand number 4323 with her brother Collen (11 years), young sister Anna (8 years) and their grandmother who is now blind. Chenai   dropped out of school when she was doing her form 1 and is the one now providing for the family .She works at a nearby farm as a child minder for the farm laborers. Though she is working her income is not even enough to sustain them for half a month.”This food pack relieved me, at least we can have decent meals”, she said with a smile.

    Memory Gumbo (16 years) stays at stand number 6678 with her two sisters Mary( 11 years) and Tracy (8 years) and brother Ian(7 years).Their father passed away  in 2009.After their father’s death their mother re-married  ,her new husband would always physically abuse them. These two went to Malawi, the country of the man’s origins. Since their parents went away, Memory had to become the household head. She could not hide her happiness when we visited their “home” with their food pack.

    NB: Pseudo names were used in this report

    Impact
    Remarkable changes can be noted in Hatcliffe Extension as a result of the organisation’s activities. A good number of children are opening up to our field workers; more can now talk about their situations freely, also more children are participating in our programmes. Livelihood support has brought a great relief to the families who are receiving the support on a monthly basis. Households benefitting from this project can now afford two decent meals a day.  As a result of this project malnutrition is being reduced in the minors, especially those who are receiving treatment (ART). The educational assistance project has also brought significant changes to the community, the children who had been forced to drop out of school by reasons beyond their control were re-placed into school .Also the payment of school fees and provision of stationery has lessened the burden from household heads, particularly child heads and the elderly.

    Ongoing Activities

    • Fundraising
    • Development of proposals
    •  

    Observations

    • Most families, particularly child headed households depend entirely on support from the organization.
    • The educational assistance project is being useful, school attendance has increased.
    •  

    Challenges

    • Inadequate financial resources  have adversely affected our interventions
    • Absence of an outreach vehicle has affected our efficiency and effectiveness
    • Inadequate communication facilities  (internet, telephones etc)
    •  

    Recommendations

    • Carrying out more fundraising and resource mobilisation activities
    • Starting activities in other districts of the Harare Metropolitan Province
    • Conducting Reproductive Health Forums with female children
    • Mobilising resources for the livelihood support of three hundred families in the Harare Metropolitan Province.

    Future Plans (Activities of the month of December

      • Distribution of livelihood support ,Christmas Hampers to 108 households
      • Day outreach
      • Fundraising

 

 

   
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